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No Big Electronics On Some Middle East Flights


Due to potential terrorist attacks, a new rule is in effect. It forbids laptops on flights from some countries to U.S. and Canadian airports. The ban include Jordan and Saudi Arabia.

Smaller devices, such as Smartphones, may be used by passengers while in flight. The larger electronics must be checked with luggage before boarding. When flying to America from the Middle East, always check with the airline and your travel agent for the latest requirements as they apply to all legs of your journey.

Amsterdam, Holland: Too Many Tourists In Red Light District PDF Print E-mail


Concerned city officials may pass laws to ban groups of over 15 visitors wandering there, and eventually forbid tours entirely. They want to prevent overcrowding, but as one city father complained “also because it is not respectful to sex workers. It is outdated to treat sex workers as a tourist attraction.”

The Dutch capital has already banned current so-called free tours, where guides and other locals encourage tourists to join them at the Red Light District for a fee plus a city tax. So, on your next visit to Amsterdam, understand and obey the rules while wandering the sights, streets, hookers and canals.

 
USA Today: Three Basics Of Courteous Air Travel PDF Print E-mail


Before you embark on your holiday flights, consider rules on how to do it without offending fellow travelers. First, don’t be noisy in your seat. For your portable electronic device, use earphones for listening and talk moderately to seatmates.

Mind your manners. Don't push seat back unless you ask and receive permission from the person behind you. Don't overflow the armrests. Relax without pushing arms, legs, smelly feet and butt against seatmates.

Bathe before leaving home or hotel to fly, then put on clean clothes and footwear. Some nice-smelling powder and deodorant can enhance your positive presence. Keep shoes and socks on during flight, especially if your feet tend to perspire.

 
New York NY: Spiffier Times Square Welcomes Visitors PDF Print E-mail


With more than 39 million people wandering annually through, the famed destination now sparkles after a major clean-up. Times Square is more like a realistic theme park version of how Disney would do New York.

So, if your travel plans include that popular spot on the Big Apple, you’ll enjoy the beautiful sky-high sights, neon lights, theaters, restaurants, street musicians and much more. Of course, the most popular and crowded time of year is during the late day and night before New Year’s Eve, with more than two million people jammed into the space. Chilly February is the least busy month at Times Square, with only about 250,000 visitors per day.

 
Traveling Senior Discounts: Always Ask For Them PDF Print E-mail


With the ever-expanding internet, competition forces businesses to face heavier competition. It applies to trains, planes, restaurants, museums, theaters and just about everything else that may affect your travel costs. The lower prices for seniors may be in effect for just one day, or always available when you speak up and ask.

Therefore, savvy seniors should always seek discounts, even if you don't see them posted in the ads. Then, you may be surprised how much money you can save. And they may apply beyond the US borders. The British call discounts concessions and pensioner's rates. In French it’s remises senior and Spanish descuentos para personas mayores.

When visiting non-English-speaking countries, memorize the local phrase for requesting senior discounts. Also, write it on a slip of paper and flash it at the hotel front desk, airport counter, store, restaurant and wherever else you want to save some senior moolah.

 
Singapore And France Ban Scooters From Sidewalks PDF Print E-mail


After many accidents and at least one fatality, the Asian city-state popular tourist destination now forbids riding e-scooters on sidewalks. New enforcements say "Those caught riding on e-scooters on footpaths will be liable for a fine of $1,472 (SGD$2000) and, or, jail up to three months.

Scooters are no longer allowed on sidewalks in France, but with more moderate fines for violators at just $150 (135 euros). Many U.S. cities already have bans, but as you can see in the photo, some speeders ignore the law and scoot cluelessly over the sidewalk signs. www.cnn.com/travel/article/singapore-e-scooter-ban-intl-hnk/index

 
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