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As Stock Market Values Rise, Travel Point Values Drop


Seniors who travel frequently are certainly aware of airlines continuing to raise the number of points needed to earn free or upgraded flights. Now, along with the nickel-and-dime price add-ons coming almost daily for air travel, hotel chains are getting into similar belt-tightening.

As recently reported by USA Today, Hilton, Marriott and Starwood have required earning free nights through their loyalty programs to cost more points. Depending on the hotel’s location and quality, the point requirements were raised from ten to 25 percent. Along with the room prices, unfortunately.

What can the senior frequent traveler do to combat these increases in the cost of transportation and hotel accommodations? The best advice is to shop around before booking. Always look for special sales that may be posted for just 24 hours. If you’re not already aware of it, make your hotel stays when prices are lowest, such as mid-week and off-season. Of course, always book mid-week and night (red eye) flights whenever possible.  

If you have a personal online or hometown travel agent, be sure you’re regularly informed of all pricing possibilities as they break.

Q: Coronavirus Fear: Should I Wear Gloves While Traveling? PDF Print E-mail


I obey all the warnings about washing hands while dealing with dirty surfaces on the road and in the air. I’ll be taking a train trip next week and wonder if I should not only wash, but also put on gloves. Advice? JKH, New Amsterdam NY

A: If you have a sore or tender skin condition, to avoid infection, wear gloves. Also, with the current epidemic, no matter what your skin condition, it’s a good idea to wear tight plastic gloves when traveling, especially while using public toilets. Thoroughly wash hands and gloves as often as possible in hot, soapy water. Carry an extra pair so you’re always prepared for protection.

 
Q: Coronavirus Fear: Should I Wear Gloves While Traveling? PDF Print E-mail


I obey all the warnings recommending washing hands while dealing with dirty surfaces on the road and in the air. I’ll be taking a train trip next week and wonder if I should not only wash, but also put on gloves. Advice? JKH, New Amsterdam NY

A: If you have sore or tender skin, wear gloves. No matter what your skin condition, it’s a good idea to wear tight plastic gloves when using public transportation, especially when using public toilets. Thoroughly wash hands and gloves as often as possible in hot, soapy water. Carry an extra pair so you’re always prepared for protection.

 
Fly Clean With Wipes & Never Use Aircraft Seat Pocket PDF Print E-mail


Medical experts advise you to steer clear of that little holder bag on the back of the seat in front of you. Too often, bare feet, dirty diapers, outdated food and soiled underwear are stashed in them.

It’s also a good idea to take disposable medicated tissues aboard, and before you sit down, wipe off the headrest, seatbelt buckle and tray table. Also, when you gotta go into airport and aircraft toilets, wipe off the inside handle of the doors and other surfaces. With the spread of coronavirus, it’s always wise to fly as hygienically as possible, or not fly until the problem settles down.

 
WalletHub: Top U.S. Cities For Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day PDF Print E-mail


Named the best: #5. Tampa FL, #4. Pittsburgh PA, #3. Philadelphia PA, #2, Boston MA, #1.  Chicago IL. History: All of these cities experienced large arrivals of Irish immigrants during the 19th and early 20th Centuries. Their traditions are still practiced throughout the U.S.A.

WalletHub compared 200 of the largest cities across the nation, and found many traditional Irish pubs and restaurants, especially in the top five. If your travels take you to any of those destinations, you’ll find a variety of ways, including colorful parades and bright music, to celebrate in true Irish traditions. www.usatoday.com/picture-gallery/travel/airline-news/2020/03/04/best-cities-st-patricks-day-per-wallethub

 
Gripe: Why Do Coach Airline Seats Keep Getting Smaller? PDF Print E-mail


Q: For business, I fly often and necessarily as cheap as possible. At six feet three inches tall, I’m getting more uncomfortable each time I travel by air. It’s because of greedy airline jam us into ever smaller spaces. How can I avoid it? PLJ, Memphis TN

A: Of course, it’s inconvenient painful and potentially dangerous for big passengers. If there must be a quick evacuation, there’s the danger of being unable to get out of your seat in a hurry. The best advice to find more reasonable fares to fly in larger spaces is to keep checking for special prices, such as midweek and red eye flights. Also, choose to cut back on other travel expenses and pay for the pricier seats when you fly.

 
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