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Traveling Seniors Beware: Heavy Flu Season Predicted PDF Print E-mail


Medical experts are shouting out the bad news that the end of 2019 and following winter months of 2020 could involve the worst flu outbreaks in 20 years. First, of course, for wandering oldsters to get your flu shots before venturing on the road or into the sky. Also, when buying gifts and and other shopping during this season, save time, avoid sneezy crowds and do as much as possible by online orders to be delivered to giftees and/or your home.

Protect yourself in jammed airports, airplanes, stores and other places where masses of people sniffle and sneeze too close to you. Carry a sanitized cloth mask for where holiday and travel dangers may be most severe. Also take along packs of medicated disposable paper towels for when you’ll be using toilets in stores, airports and airplanes.

www.accuweather.com/en/health-wellness/most-active-flu-season-since-2003-is-already-wreaking-havoc-in-the-us/644427

 
Air Travel: Positive Politeness Always Helps PDF Print E-mail


Of course, during the busy holiday and vacation seasons, everything about airports and aircraft boarding can be confusing to seniors. When unexpected delays happen, frustration and anger too often lead to yelling at the nearest airline people.

A bit of advice voiced by your travel4seniors.com editor and frequent flyer may help the next time, and it will, happen to you. No matter the problem, keep calm and respectful to the airport staff. I do and it paid off recently to me while hanging around hoping to board a flight. I was at the end of the long line of other people waiting impatiently for a possible cancellation. Suddenly my name was called, and this quietly respectful flyer was then seated as the last passenger before take-off. So, always remember: Politeness pays off!

 
Senior Sailors Beware: Avoid Cruise Ship Tragedies PDF Print E-mail


For seniors on ocean voyages, it’s a fun adventure with scenic waters, interesting port visits, onboard entertainment, great dining and much more. However, you’re also sailing into challenges aboard a large, mostly metal vehicle that can be much more physically dangerous than what older people normally face on dry land.

First, there’s boarding as you make your way up a steep ramp. You pass many outside railings as you walk through the ship, and during rough seas, you must be careful of falling at all times. Additionally, although the rules forbid it, some passengers climb on rails to shoot selfies and otherwise take chances that may cause injury or worse,

Recently a young father died after he fell four stories from a balcony to a lower deck on a Carnival cruise ship. The accident follows the death of an 18-month-old Indiana girl. who was dropped accidentally out of a mid-ship porthole by her grandfather.

For cruising seniors, be sure you know all the safety rules, and while aboard follow them intelligently to prevent such tragic accidents.

 
When Flying Economy, Sit Up Straight, Cheapskate! PDF Print E-mail


After waiting in the jammed airport boarding line, once in your cheap seat there's no space to lean back and recline. Just isn’t much leg stretching room either. At holiday times and beyond, airlines are squeezing more cheap passengers aboard to make added money. Before airline deregulation, many economy class seats had a generous 36 inches in width and comfy legroom. Today, some have as little as 28 inches. So, while flying in your bargain seat, just sit back, squeeze your knees and try to relax.

 
Don’t Be A Buffet Buffoon: Keep Dirty Hands From Food PDF Print E-mail


Touching restaurant food you don't take is offensive and possibly dangerous to other diners. Always use spoons, forks, tongs or other utensils to serve yourself. But even if you do bare hand but decide you don’t want bread, fruit, cake or other food, take it anyhow. Better to waste a roll than spread norovirus or other germs on other buffet diners.

 
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