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Airplane Mob Scene: Pay To Be First Off?


According to USAToday, airlines are considering adding yet another nickel-and-dime cost to their already ever-increasing fees for baggage, carry-ons and other formerly free services.

You can already pay an extra $10 to $25 to board flights early on some airlines before the mobs of coach-seat peasants. Soon, passengers may be able to pay a similar extra fee to get off their flights first after landing.

When the new fee goes into effect, you lowly coach flyers will be able to see their first-class sneers close up as they strut by to exit before you.

Airport To Downtown: Book Cheapest & Most Direct Way PDF Print E-mail


After landing at a busy terminal and grabbing your luggage, it’s too often an expensive hassle to get to the city. Taxis, limos and other individual auto services can be expensive, with ever-growing prices, more so at holiday season. Before you fly, research and reserve online to book the most efficient and cheapest mode of transportation. Including scheduled public buses and trains, those services are usually less expensive.

 
Winter Travel Crowds Bring Flu Dangers To Avoid PDF Print E-mail


Before you hit the road or sky, get a flu vaccine shot. With store and airport holiday crowds jammed together, your chances of mixing with sick people are highest of the year. Also take supplies of antibiotic medicines with you, as well as a kit with tissues, soap and other disposable heath products.

To avoid contamination, try to stay away from obviously ill coughers and sneezers. And always wash your hands before and after meals, as well as when using public restrooms. If you’re susceptible to catching colds or flu when in crowded travel situations, it’s a good idea to wear disposable medical face masks.

 
Delta Tightens Leash On Flying Canines & Felines PDF Print E-mail


Changes are in effect because of many incidents of passenger complaints and in-flight sanitary problems. Tougher rules now apply, including no pet puppies nor kittens allowed in passenger areas, and no emotional support animals on flights lasting over eight hours. So, take heed, Delta flyers. Know when to leave Fido and/or Fluffy at home.

 
Flying Nuns Accused Of Sinning $500,000 Into Sin City PDF Print E-mail


Two senior California nuns are in trouble for absconding with church money in large amounts over ten years of flights to Las Vegas. And the flashy town didn’t earn its evil nickname by holding religious services in its gaudy casinos. Hey, brother, is that a sister sitting at the next slot machine?

Obviously the nuns didn’t wear their habits at the casinos, but did have the bad habit of stealing and betting church money in Sin City. Charges are not yet reported, but you can bet there will be some fervent pleas offered heavenward. Of course, we traveling seniors will continue praying religiously as we invest our pension money at Las Vegas casinos.

 
Q: Should We Take Our First Trip To Sinful Las Vegas? PDF Print E-mail


My spouse and I both retired from teaching last year, and for religious and other reasons have never gambled in a casino. We’re invited to speak at a convention at Caesars Palace next month. We’re tempted, but…. What do you suggest? TRMcD, Ogden UT

A: Unless your religion expressly forbids it, go to the convention. Of course, its called Sin City, but there are countless other things to do in Las Vegas besides gambling, and many are free. For example, check out Fountain Shops and art displays at Caesars, as well as downtown Fremont Street where there are nightly sky-filled lights, music and huge projected images.

There’s the Conservatory at the Bellagio Resort, with beautiful blooming trees and flowers, huge aquarium at the Silverton Resort and interactive art museums at the Cosmopolitan and City Center. And don’t miss the Statue of Liberty at New York New York and Grand Canal at the Venetian. And, if you have the time and interest, there’s much more to enjoy.

 
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